Indian Journal of Cancer
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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Second-hand smoke exposure and its determinants among nonsmoking adolescents residing in slum areas of Bhubaneswar, India


 Department of Community Medicine, Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences, Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India

Correspondence Address:
Ansuman Panigrahi,
Department of Community Medicine, Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences, Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_265_19

PMID: 33402582

Background: Second-hand exposure (SHS) is a significant public health problem and accounts for over 600,000 deaths among non smokers worldwide every year. The study aimed to estimate the prevalence and determinants of SHS exposure among nonsmoking adolescents residing in slum areas of Bhubaneswar, India. Methods: Multistage cluster random sampling was used to select 259 nonsmoking adolescents from eleven slum areas. We used descriptive statistics to determine the prevalence of SHS exposure and inferential statistics using multivariable logistic regression model to identify factors associated with SHS exposure. Results: Of the 259 adolescent participants, 67 (25.9%) were exposed to SHS inside home and 97 (37.5%) were exposed outside home. About 47.5% adolescents were exposed to anti-smoking media messages and 22.8% were unaware of the harmful effects of exposure to SHS. SHS exposure inside home was associated with smokeless tobacco use (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 10.64; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.57-43.48), illiteracy of father (aOR: 5.40; 95% CI: 1.51-19.32), non-exposure to antismoking media messages (aOR: 3.53; 95% CI: 1.06-11.72), and absence of knowledge regarding harmful effects of SHS (aOR: 3.72; 95% CI: 1.15-12.05). Also, variables like male gender (aOR: 10.31; 95% CI: 4.50-23.81), smokeless tobacco use (aOR: 2.43; 95% CI: 1.05-5.65), illiteracy of father (aOR: 4.58; 95% CI: 1.23-17.14), and non-exposure to antismoking media messages (aOR: 4.04; 95% CI: 1.49-10.89) had increased SHS exposure outside home. Conclusion: The findings underscore the urgent need to implement comprehensive smoke-free policies to reduce SHS exposure among slum adolescents.




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